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Friday, May 30, 2014

The Ebb And Flow Continues

http://reflectionsfromthebellcurve.blogspot.com/search?q=The+Ebb+And+Flow+Of+Friendship

Although not much has changed with respect to my older friendships since writing the post above, reading it brought into focus a few of the newer relationships I've developed over the ensuing three years. What has shifted for you with respect to friendships, old or new, over the same period?

My most valued new relationship has been built around a shared love of reading. Soon after moving in early 2010, I began attending my first ever book club. By the time I'd completed the first few selections made by the librarian who moderates the club meetings, I knew this person was going to be part of my life. And though it took more than a year for our relationship to transcend those meetings, I was confident it would happen. As our after meeting conversations deepened, we took the next step and arranged to have dinner with our respective spouses. The four of us have since done so several times, including a culinary trip to Russia - loud ethnic music, OK food, terrific company.

Even better, although not at all surprising, my new friend and my wife get along so well my friend has joined my wife's book club, which I've wisely, if reluctantly steered clear of.  It's a full circle via reading. The ebb and flow continues.

2 comments:

  1. Friendships, whether old or new, near or far, take work. If the work necessary to maintain a friendship is construed as a negative, keeping the relationship alive is nonsensical. After all, isn't the essence of friendship the naturalness with which the relationship enhances our lives? But even the most cherished relationships take work. And whether or not we are willing to do the work can often determine the life-expectancy of the friendship. The ebb and flow, seasons and reasons, are all just ways to explain the extent to which we are willing, at particular junctions in our lives, to expend energy to maintain a certain relationship.

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    1. Anonymous; My most longing takeaway from your comment will be how you equate willingness to do the necessary work vs. life expectancy of the relationship - has the ring of truth to me. Thanks for joining in and especially for taking the time the read the 2011 post ("...seasons and reasons...") as well.

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